Thursday, November 10, 2011

Multiple Sclerosis and Autism


If you google the two conditions together you will see an interesting trend of articles and studies. Those studies are mostly about parents with MS having children with autism. This suggests a link they are currently studying, but have no distinct answers on yet.

My own conditions have been getting progressively worse over the years. I fatigue faster, lose coordination a lot, have trouble forming words and speaking, and I have increasing random tremors that are more like lightning jolts. Autism isn't particularly know for being a progressive condition. So what's the difference?

I found this information about the nerve effects of the two conditions:

MS is a degeneration of protective layers around nerve endings, eventually leading to progressive nerve damage.

Autism is a developmental disorder of the nerves themselves.

So, from those two descriptions, it's entirely possible to start out with Aspergers or some other form of autism and develop MS later on. Like Autism, MS can have profusely different effects on each person. It's another broad spectrum with a hundred million combinations.

In any case, I am sitting on a possible MS diagnosis. That's why I'm researching it to learn what the possibilities are and what I can do about it. No, I can't stop it from happening, but knowledge is power. If I have to live with this condition, I want to know as much about it as possible. I see the neurologist this month.

I find the connection thought provoking to say the least. There are connections being drawn to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's as well. Is there a common root to link them all? If so, how do you find it? It must be like finding a specific needle in a stack of needles as big as the proverbial haystack.

6 comments:

shell said...

There surely is a connection. Many people with MS actually have late stage Lymes Disease. It is hard to tell the difference. The Lyme blood test is said to be around 40% accurate. I think that South Hampton Hospital will receive blood from your lab. It is supposed to be 90% accurate. In my opinion, the practical difference is that if after a hot shower, you feel worse, then it leans toward MS. If better it leans towards Lymes. There are people who claim Lymes is now airborne and not just from a tick bite.Lyme can affect an unborn child or be passed from the mom. Many people believe Autistic kids have Lymes and there is a high correlation. Shell of,"Recovering Autism ADHD and Special Needs," on youtube

DJ Wilde said...

Very interesting, shell, thank you.

Anonymous said...

I was diagnosed with MS in 2002 at the age of 32. My son was about to turn 1 year old a couple of weeks after my diagnosis. He has since been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome and is now 10 1/2 and sometimes life's been difficult, but he's the most wonderful, loving boy who is always happy and I wouldn't change him for anyone!! I've always believed that there was some kind of link with autism and auto-immune illnesses (not just MS in particular). Some of the people whom I have been in contact with over the years and who also have children on the spectrum have conditions like Crohn's Disease, ME, Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus.....I knew that there'd be a link investigated somewhere down the track. Good luck with your future health David.....it's no walk in the park, but regardless.....we have a life to live, and we need to live it well...... MS mum

DJ Wilde said...

MS mum, you are absolutely right. We have to keep on living forward. I have every intent on that. Like you, I have great kids who need me and I want to be around for them as long as I can.

Ruth-A-N said...

I am a Mom with MS and I have a daughter with Crohns and another one with allergies, asthma and who was almost spina bifida..and my daughter who is Asperger's and I am pretty certain that I am on the Spectrum as well,Aspergers. I was suspect MS at 21 and diagnosed at 36...however ataxia showed up early as well as hyperlexia..any way...life is still okay on on we go

David Wilde said...

Thank you Ruth, well said